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Rally Obedience (Rally O)

What is Rally Obedience?

Known also as Rally-O or Rally, this dog sport was developed for the pet dog owner who is not interested in the precision required for traditional competition dog obedience.  In other words this is the more relaxed version of competition dog obedience.

Handlers are not allowed to speak to their dog other than the instruction in traditional competition dog obedience. Whereas the handlers are allowed to speak to encourage their dogs during the course in rally. However, the handler is not allowed to touch the dog or make physical corrections.

The rally course includes 10 to 20 stations, depending on the level. Scoring is not as rigorous as traditional obedience.

Communication between handler and dog is encouraged and perfect heel position is not required, but there should be a sense of teamwork between the dog and handler.

What Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC) titles can be attained?

Go to the ANKC’s Rules for the Conduct of Rally Obedience Trials for a list of the class titles.

Is my dog suitable for Rally Obedience?

All dogs are eligible to compete in Rally Obedience.  Dogs who participate in Rally are dogs that have been trained and conditioned to compete at Novice level and in the presence of other dogs. (source: ANKC)

Age restriction: Puppies six months of age or over.

Where can I do Rally Obedience?

Find a dog club near you by contacting Australian National Kennel Council‘s State member bodies:

Dogs ACT

Dogs West

Dogs Queensland

Dogs NT

Dogs NSW

Dogs SA

Dogs Tasmania

Dogs Victoria

Gone are the dogs rally

gone_full_logo_white_bgA rally will be held in Sydney to coincide with the Public Hearing set down for the current NSW Parliamentary Inquiry into Greyhound Racing.

Details:
Thursday 6 February, 2014.
Martin Place amphitheatre, Sydney
(located between Pitt & Castlereagh streets)
8am – 10am

More information here.

Border Collie breed profile

Border Collie breed profile

Photo: Echo Grid/Unsplash.com

Classification

The Border Collie is classed as Group 5 (Working dogs) by the Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC).

History

The Border Collie as a breed was originated in Northumberland, a place on the very border of England and Scotland. The breed is developed for the purpose of herding livestock, especially sheep. The name “Border Collie” came from the simple fact the breed had been developed in a place on the Anglo-Scottish border.  The breed was originally developed in and for the conditions existing on the vast tracts of land where the terrain varies from mountains to sweeping moorlands, the winter weather conditions being very bleak with snow, wind and sleet.

The Border Collie was first shown in Australia at the Sydney Royal in 1933 as “Any Other Variety”.  Later, they were shown in the non-sporting group and in 1953, a separate group was formed known as the ‘The Australian Working Dog Group’, comprising the Australian Cattle Dog, the Australian Kelpie and the Border Collie.

Physical characteristics

The Border Collie is a well balanced, medium-sized dog of athletic appearance, displaying gracefulness, power and agility in equal measure. The male is 48–56 cm in height and the female is 46–53 cm.  The weight for a male is 14–20 kg and female is 12–19 kg.

The Border Collie has two varieties of coat: rough and smooth. Both are double coats, with a coarser outer coat and soft undercoat. The rough variety is medium length with feathering on the legs, chest, and belly. The smooth variety is short all over, usually coarser in texture than the rough variety, and feathering is minimal.

The Border Collie dog appears in many different colours and colour combinations. The black and white is most familiar.  There are also blue and white, chocolate and white, red and white, blue merle and the tricolour (black, tan and white).

Because of its strong bones, the dog is able to run gracefully and have a tireless gait, changing direction and covering ground almost effortlessly. The Border Collie’s stamina and agility also allow it to remain active for long periods of time.

Sheep can be anywhere from nervous/frightened to aggressive. The ‘stealth’ referred to in the Standard is the Border Collies’ ability to ‘work’ his flock in a manner that does not disturb or distress them – a light footed, quiet movement, not drawing attention to itself until required.

Personality traits

Border Collie Breed Profile

Photo: Dawid Sobolewski/Unsplash.com

The ANKC says the Border Collie has an instinctive tendency to work and is readily responsive to training. It’s keen, alert and eager expression add to its intelligent appearance, whilst its loyal and faithful nature demonstrates that it is at all times kindly disposed towards the stock.

Highly energetic purpose-bred working dog, the Border Collie is eager to learn and most in its element when it has something to do. If your dog doesn’t have something to do they will make up an activity for themselves. This is usually something undesirable, like digging up the yard, but may be potentially disastrous, like herding children!

The Border Collie is known for his intense stare, or “eye,” with which he controls his flock.

Note: All dogs are individuals. While there is a great difference between dog breeds there is also a difference in temperament within breeds. Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialisation.

Care and Exercise

Diet – Border Collie’s generally need 1.5 to 2 cups of high-quality dry food a day, divided into two meals. However, how much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference–the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and increase your dog’s longevity.  Discuss with your veterinarian and a responsible breeder about the best diet that is appropriate for a Border Collie’s life stage from puppy to adult to senior. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

Grooming – needs weekly brushing to keep coat oils well distributed, and to prevent matting in the rough variety. More frequent brushing during shedding season is a good idea to minimize hair shed around the house. Bathe only as needed — about every four months or when he’s really dirty or smells terrible.  Their nails should be trimmed regularly to avoid overgrowth and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection.

Shedding – The Border Collie coat sheds seasonally and will need extra brushing at these times.

Exercise and Games – If you live in the city, you’ll need to engage his mind and high energy with training sessions or dog sports.  Spend time together going for a run or throwing a ball at the dog park.  Dogs should always be kept on a lead when in a public place.

Training

The Border Collie thrives on training!  Start training early using positive reinforcement dog training methods. Socialisation with gradual introductions to dogs, people, other animals and things is essential.

Dog sports are a great way for you and Border Collie to exercise and spend time together. Border Collies are capable of reaching the highest heights in Obedience, Rally O, Tracking, Endurance, Herding, Disc dog and Dances with Dogs titles.

Health issues

A health Border Collie has a life span of 12 – 14 years. This breed has the possibility of having three hereditary diseases:

  • Ceroid Lipofuscinosis – is not contagious, but it is fatal and cannot be treated. It affects the nervous system including the brain. Ceroid Lipofuscinosis is known as Battens Disease in Humans.
  • Collie Eye Anomaly – also known as CEA, is an inherited disease causing defects in the formation of the eye.
  • Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome (TNS) – is an immune deficiency in Border Collies. There is no cure for TNS and it appears to always be fatal eventually. Antibiotic and steroid treatment can help affected dogs live a relatively active life.

Other health issues that can be found in Border Collies are Hip Dysplasia and Elbow Dysplasia.

Talk to a veterinarian about health issues for this breed.

Note: While good breeders cannot guarantee the health of their pups, they will utilise genetic testing of their breeding stock to reduce the likelihood of inherited disorders in their puppies.

Suitability

The Border Collie is a high energy breed suitable for active families who can provide their dog with plenty of daily mental stimulation and exercise.  The noisy play of young children can stimulate the Border Collie’s herding instinct and cause him to nip, nudge, and bark.

As it is a purpose-bred working dog, the Border Collie generally needs something to do. If you are looking for a cuddly, couch potato dog, the Border Collie is not for you.  If you don’t have a farm with sheep, dog sports are a good alternative to provide an outlet for his natural energy and mental stimulation.

The Border Collie can live indoors or outdoors – as long as you spend time with your dog!  This breed is generally not suited for apartment living and should be given regular access to the outdoors.

Never leave a puppy or adult dog alone with your young child! If you are unable to supervise, then separate your pup and child. Crate training your puppy to give him a safe and fun space to be on his own for short periods is recommended.

Adoption in Australia

Border Collie Rescue Australia
Working Dog Rescue

More details on the breed

Australian National Kennel Council
National Border Collie Council

 Thinking of getting a dog? Download our FREE eGuide: Before you get a dog – 8 essential tips to get it right!

 

Canine intestinal parasitic diseases

Canine intestinal parasitic diseases

Canine intestinal parasitic diseases

Canine intestinal parasitic diseases

Roundworms are the most common parasite in dogs. Photo: Dominik QN/Unsplash.com

Dogs at any age are susceptible to these common canine intestinal parasitic diseases – Roundworm, Hookworm, Whipworm and Flea Tapeworm. However, puppies are at a greater risk.

Some of these parasites in dogs pose a significant risk to humans, particularly children. So, it’s important that your puppy or adult dog is protected against these nasty canine intestinal parasitic diseases.

We have 3 simple steps to help keep your dog healthy.

Roundworm (Toxocara canis and felis)

Roundworms are the most common of the canine intestinal parasitic diseases. Most dogs become infected with them at some time in their lives, usually as puppies. Younger dogs are especially vulnerable to roundworms because their immune systems are not fully mature yet and they aren’t able to fight off the adult worms as effectively as an adult dog can.

How is it transmitted?

Dogs are often infected with Roundworms prenatally. The eggs have been picked up by the mother but fail to complete their life cycle and form cysts in her tissues. The hormonal changes of pregnancy causes them to migrate into her puppies. Roundworms can also develop in a puppy after it is born when the puppy ingests eggs from the environment or suckles worm larvae (young Roundworms) in the bitch’s milk.

A less common way of infestation is when Roundworm lavae are present in the tissues of a mouse or another small mammal and the puppy eats the animal.

What are the signs of Roundworms?

Major Roundworm infections can cause the following signs in puppies:

  • Diarrhoea
  • Vomiting
  • Weight loss
  • Dull coat
  • A potbellied appearance

A heavy burden of Roundworms may cause intestinal obstruction.  Adult Roundworms may be vomited or appear in your dog’s faeces – they are several centimetres long and look like strips of elastic or pasta.

Treatment

Your vet can provide a quality de-wormer that will safely and effectively get rid of the worms.

Roundworm risk to humans

Roundworms do pose a significant risk to humans, usually children who can ingest them in soil contaminated with dog faeces. The parasite can travel to the eye, lung, heart and cause neurological signs.

Children should not be allowed to play in areas where there could be dog faeces. Practice good hygiene after playing and definitely before eating.

Hookworm (Ancylostoma canninum)

The Hookworm is a tiny parasite that attaches to the lining of the intestinal wall and feeds on the dog’s blood. It’s eggs are shed into the digestive tract and pass into the environment through the dog’s faeces.

How is it transmitted?

Larvae (young Hookworms) that hatch from hookworm eggs live in the soil. These larvae can infect dogs by ingestion or through contact and penetration of the skin.

What are the signs of Hookworm?

Hookworms suck blood and therefore cause internal blood loss. They are a serious threat to dogs, especially young puppies that may not survive the blood loss without transfusions.

The signs in a dog:

  • Looks unhealthy and the linings of its nostrils, lips, and ears will be pale
  • Poor appetite
  • If hookworm larvae get into the lungs, the dog will cough
  • Dark and tarry stool, diarrhea, and constipation
  • Weight loss

Treatment

Hookworms cannot be seen with the naked eye and must be therefore be microscopically examined by your veterinarian through a stool specimen. The treatment is as for Roundworms.

Hookworm risk to humans

Hookworm larvae can penetrate the skin as well as be swallowed. The signs of Hookworm depend on the route of entry but can include skin irritation, diarrhea, intestinal bleeding and moderate to severe abdominal pain.

Whipworm (Trichuris vulpris)

Whipworms attach to the wall of the cecum, which is where the small intestine and large intestine meet (in your dog). The worms are shaped like a whip.

How is it transmitted?

Dogs become infected with Whipworms by swallowing infective whipworm eggs from ingesting contaminated soil, food or faeces in the ground.

What are the signs of Whipworm?

Dogs that are infected with a few whipworms may not have any signs of infection but more severe infections can cause:

  • Bloody diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Dehydration
  • Anemia
  • Weight loss

If an infected dog is not treated, then severe whipworm infection can cause serious disease and even death.

Treatment for Whipworm

The veterinarian will confirm the diagnosis by conducting the faecal flotation procedure on a stool sample.

Your veterinarian can prescribe safe and effective products that will treat and control both the worms and larvae living within the dog’s body.

Whipworm Risk to humans

Whipworm is not transmissible to humans.

Flea Tapeworm (Diplidium caninum)

The flea Tapeworm is a long, flat worm that attaches to the dog’s small intestine. It consists of a ‘head’ or scolex and a number of segments each with its own reproductive organs.

How is it transmitted?

All Tapeworms have an immediate host (necessary for the completion of the life cycle), which the dog eats to become infected. For the flea Tapeworm it is the flea.

What are the signs of Flea Tapeworm?

As the flea tapeworm attaches loosely to the dog’s intestine and feeds on digested food, dogs usually are not sick, so not cause pain and do not lose weight from the worms.

They are generally only diagnosed by the presence of segments in the dog’s faeces, which look like grains of rice or seeds and often wriggle. Tapeworm segments are visible with the naked eye. They are generally seen around the dog’s anus or on the faeces.

Your dog may ‘scoot’ on their rear end on the ground but this is often due to infected anal glands.

Treatment for FleaTapeworm

If you think your dog is infected with tapeworms, call your veterinarian for an appointment to get an accurate diagnosis and safe, effective de-wormer treatment.

Tapeworm risk to humans

People may pick up Tapeworm segments from the ground and develop an asymptomatic infestation.

3 steps to protect your dog and family against canine intestinal parasitic diseases 

  1. Pick up your dog poo! Internal parasitic diseases control should focus on daily removal of faeces in your yard and prevention of dogs having contact with faeces in public places like the dog park.
  2. Because fleas are an immediate host for the most common type of tapeworm, you’ll need consistent, effective flea control.
  3. Talk to your veterinarian about the appropriate worming protocol for your dog. Puppies should be treated at 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks of age and then receive a monthly treatment until 6 months. Nursing mothers should be wormed with their puppies to decrease the risk of transmission.  A 3 monthly worming with a broad spectrum anthelmintic for adult dogs is recommended or the use of heartworm control which also controls intestinal worms.

 

Vets fight antibiotic resistance in pets

Vets fight antibiotic resistance in pets
Vets fight antibiotic resistance in pets

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Vets play a vital role in tackling antibiotic resistance in pets

Australia’s peak veterinary body, the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA), says the veterinary profession has long been proactive in working alongside human heath experts to fight antibiotic resistance in pets at every opportunity.

Antimicrobial Resistance – from awareness to action, is the theme of World Veterinary Day on 29 April and it highlights the important role that vets play in ensuring responsible use of antimicrobials in farm animals and in pets. Continue Reading →

Inspiring story of paraplegic Charlene Meade and competition dog agility

Charlene Meade is a paraplegic and dog agility competitor – she’s proof that being in a wheel chair is no barrier to having pets

Charlene Meade

Charlene Meade and her faithful Sheltie Brook

Former Paralympian Charlene Meade is one of the longest living paraplegics from trauma at 84 years old.  Charlene is also a big dog sports enthusiast and has won awards for agility competitions.

Charlene lives independently with her two dogs and one cat. She’s proof that being in a wheel chair is no barrier to looking after pets.

Charlene reveals her tip about getting a dog for people in a wheel chair. Her message is clear, ‘I want people to know you can easily live with a dog in a wheel chair’. Continue Reading →

List of dog sports in Australia

Dog sports in Australia

Dog sports in Australia

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Dog sports are a great way to enjoy the outdoors and bond with your dog.  We have a comprehensive list of available dogs sports in Australia to help you find an activity suitable for your dog.

When the early settlers arrived at what became Australia, they brought with them their ways of using the land to provide sustenance, this included livestock and the dogs they had used to guard and herd this stock. Working dogs quickly became part of the backbone of the developing nation, of which is was said for many years that Australia rode on the sheep’s back.

In the early 1990’s, Australia wide, people who owned dogs not in work but of the herding breeds were keen to demonstrate that their dogs. Some bred for many generations purely for showing or performance activities, were still able to perform the functions for which they were developed in the first place.  (Source: Dogs Victoria)

List of dogs sports in Australia

We have a huge range of dog sports in Australia on offer.  There is something for every dog!  The first step is to check out this list of dog sports.  The next step is to get off the lounge and take Rover to your local dog club and have fun!

Competition dog obedience
Dog Agility
Dances with dogs
Disc Dog
Earth Dog
Endurance
Flyball
Herding
Lure Coursing
Nosework
Rally Obedience (Rally O)
Retrieving and Field Trials
Sledding
Schutzhund & Ring Sports
Tracking
Track and Search
Treiball

The Australian National Kennel Council is the federal organisation representing the interests of its Member Bodies in each of the States and Territories of the Commonwealth of Australia (see below). Its mission is to promote excellence in dog sports in Australia as well as breeding, showing, and other canine related activities.

Find a dog club near you

Contact the ANKC‘s State member bodies:

Dogs ACT

Dogs West

Dogs Queensland

Dogs NT

Dogs NSW

Dogs SA

Dogs Tasmania

Dogs Victoria

 

 

Snake and tick bites in cats

Snake and tick bites in cats

Prepare for snake and tick bites in cats. Photo: Thibault Mokuenko/Unsplash

Summer is the season to be out and about but there are unexpected dangers for outdoor pets including snake and tick bites in cats, which are deadly if not treated early! Continue Reading →

Dogs with lymphoma are needed for anti-cancer drug trial

Dogs with lymphoma are needed for drug trial

Dogs with lymphoma are needed for drug trial. Photo: John Price/Unsplash

Dogs with lymphoma are needed in Sydney, NSW to help evaluate a promising new anti-cancer drug! Continue Reading →

Miniature Schnauzer

Miniature Schnauzer breed profile

Miniature Schnauzer puppy. Photo: Otsphoto/Shuttertock

Classification

The Miniature Schnauzer is classed as Group 6 (Utility) by the Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC).

History of the Miniature Schnauzer

“The Schnauzers” (pronounced “snout sirs”) reflects the fact that there are actually three breeds: the Standard Schnauzer, the smaller Miniature Schnauzer and the larger Giant Schnauzer.

The Standard is so named because it was the first of the breeds, believed to have originated in the 1400s in the regions of Bavaria and Wurttemberg in southern Germany-central Europe; it was developed from the crossing of German Poodle, Grey Wolf Spitz and Wire Haired Terrier
(German Pinscher), primarily as a ratter, droving and herding breed.  The long-established Schnauzer types of dogs are represented in artworks as early as the late 1400s and in Stuttgart, a statue of “The Nightwatchman and His Dog” dated 1620 depicts an easily identifiable Schnauzer.

From the original “standard size” the Miniature and Giant Schnauzers were developed.  The Miniature Schnauzer was developed to be smaller, more compact size for ratting by combining it with the Affenpinscher and Miniature Poodle. The first recorded Miniature Schnauzer appeared in 1888, and the first exhibition was held in 1899.

The three sizes are still instinctive ratters and excellent watchdogs while being reliable, loyal family pets. In fact, the characteristic very short tails and cropped ears came about to avoid rat bites, which were not only painful but could transfer rabies; in addition, the tails of the Standard and Giant were prone to injuries. The Schnauzer and Giant Schnauzer exhibit a formidable appearance to intruders and the Miniature vociferously warns of strangers.

The Schnauzer was first introduced into Australia in 1934 by Mr A Hordern who imported three Standard Schnauzers. One litter was bred but breeding did not continue.  The Miniature Schnauzer was brought to Australia by Mrs I Rees of Casa Verde Kennels in the 1960s, Eng/Aust Ch Gosmore Wicket Keeper, who sired several champions.

Physical characteristics of the Miniature Schnauzer

Miniature Schnauzer breed profile

Miniature Schnauzer Image: ANKC

The ANKC describes the breed standard as sturdily built, robust, sinewy, nearly square, (length of body equal to height at shoulders). Expression keen and attitude alert. Correct conformation is of more importance than colour or other purely ‘beauty’ points.  It is well balanced, smart, stylish and adaptable.

The coat is harsh, wiry and short enough for smartness with a dense undercoat. The hair is clean on the neck and shoulders, ears and skull. Harsh hair on legs. Furnishings fairly thick but not silky.

The ideal height for the male dog is 36 cms (14 ins) and the female dog is 33 cms (13 ins).

Colours of the Miniature Schnauzer

The colours are:

  • pepper and salt, shades range from dark iron grey to light grey. Hairs banded dark/light/dark. Dark facial mask to harmonise with corresponding coat colour.
  • Pure Black.
  • Black and silver with solid black with silver markings on eyebrows, muzzle, chest, brisket, forelegs below the point of the elbow, inside of hind legs below stifle joint, vent and under the tail.
  • White.

Good pigmentation essential in all colours.

Personality traits of the Miniature Schnauzer

The ANKC describes the temperament as alert, reliable and intelligent. Primarily a companion dog.

The Miniature Schnauzer is generally a well-tempered dog, with high energy levels and an enthusiastic attitude towards people and animals around it. They are feisty dogs, and do not like to be left alone for long periods, and require interaction and company to stay happy.  He is a guard dog with the heart of a lion and will differentiate between your friends and enemies.

All three Schnauzer breeds can be good with children as long as they are positively socialised with kids as puppies.

The Standards and Giants are slow to mature and can, therefore, be quite a handful until normally in their prime at 2-3 years of age, whilst the Miniature will be mature by twelve months of age.

Note: All dogs are individuals. While there is a great difference between dog breeds there is also a difference in temperament within breeds. Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialisation.

Care for the Miniature Schnauzer

Diet – How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference–the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and increase your dog’s longevity.  Discuss with your veterinarian and a responsible breeder about the best diet that is appropriate for a Miniature Schnauzer’s life stage from puppy to adult to senior. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

Feeding the dog low- or non-fatty and unsweetened foods may help to avoid health issues associated with high-fat levels.

Grooming – To keep your dog looking great, clipping and grooming a Miniature Schnauzer is recommended every 6 weeks.  In between clips to maintain your dog’s appearance, you need to brush the coat regularly.

Shedding – The Miniature Schnauzer is low shedding.

Exercise and Games – The Miniature Schnauzer is full of energy, and requires daily walks, however, they do not need to be strenuous as the size of the dog means that although it is energetic, it can’t keep going forever and a 30-40 minute walk should be suitable.  This highly trainable breed will enjoy dog sports including agility and competition obedience.  Miniature Schnauzers also participate in earthdog trials and often excel at them.  Teach your Schnauzer tricks — he’s a great tricks dog.

Training for the Miniature Schnauzer

The Miniature Schnauzer is an attentive and clever dog that picks up new tricks and lessons with ease.

While dog training is imperative for the development of an acceptable temperament and socialisation skills for all breeds, it’s also a stimulating and exciting pastime for this incredibly trainable dog breed.

Dog training is a great way to bond with your dog. Start training your puppy early using positive reinforcement dog training methods. Socialisation with gradual introductions to dogs, people, other animals and things is essential.

Miniature Schnauzer health issues

A UK Kennel Club survey puts the median lifespan of Miniature Schnauzers at a little over 12 years. About 20% lived to >15 years.  While generally a healthy breed, Miniature Schnauzers may suffer health problems:

  • Associated with high-fat levels including hyperlipidemia, which may increase the possibility of pancreatitis, though either may form independently. Diabetes, bladder stones and eye problems.
  • Comedone syndrome, a condition that produces pus-filled bumps, usually on their backs, which can be treated with a variety of methods.
  • Miniature Schnauzers should have their ears dried after swimming due to a risk of infection, especially those with uncropped ears; ear examinations should be part of the regular annual checkup.
  • Miniature Schnauzers are also prone to von Willebrand disease, an inherited bleeding disorder that occurs due to qualitative or quantitative deficiency of von Willebrand factor, a multimeric protein that is required for platelet adhesion.

Talk to a veterinarian about health issues for this breed.

Note: While good breeders cannot guarantee the health of their pups, they will utilise genetic testing of their breeding stock to reduce the likelihood of inherited disorders in their puppies.

Suitability of the Miniature Schnauzer as a pet

The Miniature Schnauzer is a suitable dog for families living in apartments and small living spaces.  Because of his size, he can be a good city dog but he needs daily exercise.

It’s short, wiry hair also means it is low shedding, also making it a perfect dog for families with allergies. Furthermore, it’s inquisitive and kind temperament also make it the perfect dog for young children (as long the dog has been positively socialised and interaction is supervised).

Never leave a puppy or adult dog alone with your young child! If you are unable to supervise, then separate your pup and child. Crate training your puppy to give him a safe and fun space to be on his own for short periods is recommended.

Miniature Schnauzer adoption in Australia

Schnauzer Club of NSW (Rescue)

Miniature Schnauzer Club of NSW (Rescue)

Schnauzer Rescue QLD

More details on the Miniature Schnauzer dog breed

Australian National Kennel Council

Schnauzer Club of NSW

Miniature Schnauzer Club of NSW

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